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Why You Need A Detox Bath

Detoxification of your body through bathing is an ancient remedy that anyone can perform in the comfort of their own home. In detoxification circles, your skin is known as the third kidney, and toxins are excreted through sweating. A detox bath is thought to assist your body in eliminating toxins as well as absorbing the minerals and nutrients that are in the water. Most of all, it'll leave you feeling refreshed and awakened.

Since bubble baths not necessarily being the healthiest, most nourishing alternative for your skin. Life goes on, and in much more luxurious, relaxing ways with our detox bath tips.

Prepare your bath on a day that you have at least 40 minutes available. The first 20 minutes are said to help your body remove the toxins, while the second 20 minutes are for absorbing the minerals in the water.

Fill your tub with comfortably hot water. Use a chlorine filter if possible.

Add Epsom salts (aka magnesium sulfate). Soaking in Epsom salts actually helps replenish the body magnesium level, combating hypertension.[1] The sulfate flushes toxins and helps form proteins in brain tissue and joints.[2]  Plus, Epsom salt is very inexpensive. 

Add 1 to 2 cups or more of baking soda (sodium bicarbonate). Baking soda is known for its cleansing ability and even has anti-fungal properties.[3] It also leaves skin very soft. 

Add ground ginger or fresh ginger tea. While this step is optional, ginger can increase your heat levels, helping to sweat out toxins. However, since it is heating to the body, it may cause your skin to turn slightly red for a few minutes, so be careful with the amount you add.

Add aromatherapy oils or fresh herbs. Again optional, but many people love the fragrance of such oils and for many, the oils have particular therapeutic properties to take advantage of. 

Lemon: How To Use This All-Natural Household Cleaner

Lemon, which adds such welcome zest to food and cocktails, is also a mild but highly effective cleaning agent. What makes lemon such a powerful cleanser?

Its high acid content, which enables the fruit to work as a powerful antibacterial sanitizer that combats common household bacteria. The acid in lemon juice removes dirt and rust stains. It’s especially effective when mixed with salt, which makes an excellent scouring paste.

How To Use Lemons To Clean Your:

  • Countertops: Dip the cut side of a lemon half in baking soda to tackle countertops; wipe with a wet sponge and dry. Don’t use on delicate stone, like marble, or stainless steel (it may discolor)
  • Cutting boards: To remove tough food stains from light wood and plastic cutting boards, slice a lemon in half, squeeze onto the soiled surface, rub, and let sit for 20 minutes before rinsing
  • Dishes: To increase the grease-cutting power of your dishwashing detergent, add a teaspoon of lemon juice.
  • Faucets: Combat lime scale by rubbing lemon juice onto the taps and letting it sit overnight. Wipe with a damp cloth.
  • Garbage disposal: Cut a lemon in half, then run both pieces through the disposal.
  • Grout: Spilled morning coffee on your tile countertop or backsplash? Here’s how to tackle grout stains: Add lemon juice to 1 or 2 teaspoons cream of tartar (an acidic salt that acts as a natural bleaching agent) to make a paste. Apply with a toothbrush, then rinse.
  • Hands: When you touch raw fish, the smell can linger on your fingers. Rub your hands with lemon juice, which will neutralize the odor.
  • Laundry: To brighten whites, add 1/2 cup lemon juice to the rinse cycle for a normal-size load.
  • Plastic food-storage containers: To bleach stains from tomato soup and other acidic foods on dishwasher-safe items, rub lemon juice on the spots, let dry in a sunny place, then wash as usual.